6th Month National Service Milestone – Investment Updates

I enlisted into National Service slightly more than 6 months ago on 4th July 2019.

Past one week had been happening for me as I initiated a position in Lendlease Reit at $0.93. You may refer to my review over here.

These are the few reasons I bought into Lendlease Reit.

  1. Price is near its lowest since listing in early October.
  2. Dividend Yield of 5.5% for quality properties is very attractive in current REIT market.
  3. Visible pipeline of properties for inorganic growth in the future.

I have also started buying IVV regularly using FSMOne’s ETF RSP. You can refer to this article I wrote previously on why I chose FSMOne’s ETF RSP over Kristal.AI.

For my first purchase of IVV with FSMOne’s ETF RSP, money will be deducted from your USD cash account on the 8th of every month. FSMOne will buy into the ETF one day after the deduction. This will be the transaction date. The units will be reflected on your account one day after the transaction date at the latest. For monthly investment of less than $1200, $1.07 (inclusive of GST) will be deducted before buying into the ETF. For example, my monthly investment is US$145, the available amount to buy into the ETF will be US$143.96. FSMOne allows the subscription of fractional shares of HK-listed and US-listed ETFs, thus maximising investment every month without any refunds.

You can refer to the image attached showing my asset allocation as of last trading day on 17 January 2020.

 

S/NName of CounterNo of Shares% Portfolio Value
1Astrea V300011.4%
2Koufu630018.40.%
3Lendlease Reit27009.1%
4IVV0.43960.5%
5Cash60.6%
 Total 100%

I tracked my finances few days prior to my enlistment 6 months ago on 4th July 2019. I was tidying up my personal finance spreadsheet and calculated my savings from serving NS alone. Despite the fact that I am private earning $560, I managed to save $3100. I spent close to $800 on tablet and wireless earpiece recently else I would have saved more. In the future, I might be going on an overseas trip with my friends therefore I have been transferring cash out from my warchest to savings/expenses account. If you are curious why there’s another data stating otherwise, this is because they are one-off income such as salary/incentives I received prior to enlistment.

As for my investment strategy in 2020, I will continue to buy IVV regularly. My plan for IVV is to buy them regularly until I retire. This will make up my long term portfolio. As for ETF RSP, I am setting aside $200 every month throughout NS and Uni before increasing the amount to maybe $700-800 depending on how much I earn from my full time job. By the time I graduate from Uni, I estimate that IVV will take up 50% of my portfolio while the remaining comes from dividend stock picking.     

 

7 Comments Add yours

  1. rongx says:

    Hi OP,

    Thank you for the update! Just read your reflections about COVID, gathering from the info above, I deduced that you have a substantial amount in individual counters & facing these situations for the first time is scary. May I ask if the portfolio (including cash) is your total net worth?
    If so, may I ask why?

    I’m a newbie and I hope to learn from your experience! Thank you in advance 🙂

    Like

    1. Yes it is my total net worth.

      Like

      1. Rongx says:

        If so, may I ask why?

        Like

        1. Actually, I think it was how I phrased the wording that made you confused.

          I should not use % portfolio value but instead % of net worth.

          Like

  2. newbie says:

    Hi! A newbie on this. What do you use to track your assets/ investments?
    Do you keep track on market price in real time too? Thanks!

    Like

    1. I use Stocks.Cafe and also have my own Excel Spreadsheet. The excel spreadsheet gets its data from internet which is real time.

      Like

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